Sea jellies: Northeast Pacific sea nettle and spotted lagoon jelly

I said in a previous post I would share my amateurish experience on a photoshoot, so here it is! I encourage you to click on each photo to see a larger view. If you like what you see, please subscribe to this blog to receive updates of the new photos I post, usually 3 to 5 times a week.

A couple of weekends ago, I visited the SeaLife aquarium next to LEGOLAND California. They recently added a sea jelly exhibit (also known as jelly fish, even though they are not fish), which contains several tanks with various species of jellies swimming around. The lighting of the exhibit is very colorful, which makes it for a fun visual experience, but not so great for photos since many of the lights reflect onto the tanks, making for photos covered with many colored spots. The water tanks are cylindrical so people can view the sea jellies from all around. Again this is great for viewing but not so much for taking photos since you can see the people on the other side of the tank. If you’re patient, you can wait until they leave and find the right angle. Or you can play around in Photoshop as I did for one of the photos below since the background was very compromised.

There were several tanks with moon jellies but I won’t share any photos here because they didn’t come out well that day. I do have photos of moon jellies if you’re interested in viewing them.

These first creatures are called Northeast Pacific sea nettles. This is the second photo I took in the exhibit with my good camera.

Northeast Pacific sea nettle
Northeast Pacific sea nettle

And right then and there, my camera shut down because the battery was dead. Hum, no problem, I thought, I’ll just use the other battery I have in my bag. This would have been a brilliant idea if I had actually remembered to charge that other battery when it died a few weeks ago. So there I stood, dozens of cool sea jellies floating around me with no working camera. But wait, I had my cell phone camera with me. 5MP would work but how about the lighting? And that’s when I thought, what the heck, I have nothing to lose.

So here they are, the rest of my sea jelly photos, taken with my cell phone camera and retouched in Photoshop since I couldn’t change any settings as I took the photos. Even though a lot of the photos were blurry and useless, I’m quite impressed with the way these came out.

Northeast Pacific sea nettle
Northeast Pacific sea nettle

I love the golden brown color of their bodies, especially when it’s backlit as in the photo.

Golden brown body of a Northeast Pacific sea nettle
Golden brown body of a Northeast Pacific sea nettle

This next and last one is a spotted lagoon jelly, a smaller species of jellies. I took a lot of pictures of them but this is the crispest one I managed to get. However the background was horrible, between the many light reflections and several people standing right there. So I decided to delete the whole background and add one in Photoshop, almost black but not completely, with a light grain to match the not so perfect tank water.

Spotted lagoon jelly
Spotted lagoon jelly

 

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Texture

Zazzle online shop If you enjoy my photos and would like to purchase some, I want to thank you! Simply visit my Zazzle online shop and browse the product offerings. If there’s a photo you would like to purchase but don’t see it in my shop, please contact me by using the Contact form at the bottom of my home page and let me know which photos you are interested in purchasing, and in what format / medium.

Today I’m participating in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge and her theme is “texture”. I encourage you to click on each photo to see a larger view. If you like what you see, please subscribe to this blog to receive updates of the new photos I post, usually 3 to 5 times a week.

It can be hard to photograph the texture of a subject. Sometimes you just have to remember or imagine what it feels like in real life to get the idea. Here are a few selections to illustrate various textures, some of them more pleasant than others.

I don’t think you can’t do a photo post on texture without tree bark. I find the patterns and textures of some tree barks wonderful, but I’d hate to scrape my skin on them. 🙂

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Texture of tree bark
Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Texture of tree bark

The trunk of this cork oak tree looks and feels a lot softer than an oak or pine tree trunk.

Brown cork oak tree bark
Brown cork oak tree bark

The manzinata tree bark peels off as the tree trunk and branches grow larger. The soft and curled shavings make for some interesting texture to look at and touch.

Close-up of the manzanita tree bark
Close-up of the manzanita tree bark

Soft textures feel good to the touch. I’ve never touched the fuzzy fur of a lemur but I bet it’s pretty soft. Look how fluffy it looks in the sunshine. By the way, I still have to find the time to share more photos of this lemur and his buddies, who seem to enjoy the San Diego sun tremendously.

Texture of a lemur's fuzzy fur
Texture of a lemur’s fuzzy fur

Finally you’ve got to admire (but probably not touch) the gelatinous texture of this sea jelly, which allows it to move around the ocean with the current with minimal effort. I do have more photos of sea jellies to show you also, and a funny story to share about that day. More in a later post!

The gelatinous texture of a Northeast Pacific sea nettle jelly
The gelatinous texture of a Northeast Pacific sea nettle jelly

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: two colors or hues only

Zazzle online shop If you enjoy my photos and would like to purchase some, I want to thank you! Simply visit my Zazzle online shop and browse the product offerings. If there’s a photo you would like to purchase but don’t see it in my shop, please contact me by using the Contact form at the bottom of my home page and let me know which photos you are interested in purchasing, and in what format / medium.

Today I’m participating in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge and her theme is “two colors or hues only”. I encourage you to click on each photo to see a larger view. If you like what you see, please subscribe to this blog to receive updates of the new photos I post, usually 3 to 5 times a week.

I realized it was quite a challenge to find photos that only showed two colors, and not three or more, but here’s a nice selection of my favorites, like this photo of a beautiful blue sky after the rain and a tree branch covered with leftover raindrops.

Rain drops on a tree branch after the rain
Rain drops on a tree branch after the rain

To continue with the water theme, here are some sea jellies lit up in blue in an aquarium, with the water as a black background.

Sea jellies
Sea jellies

I love to capture red and green on the same picture. These complementary colors are some of my favorite to see in nature, as on this Cotoneaster Lacteus bush in seeds.

Cotoneaster Lacteus bush with red seeds
Cotoneaster Lacteus bush with red seeds

Here’s another example to illustrate how well red and green go together on this passion flower in full bloom.

Passionfruit flower with large red petals and long pistils
Passion flower with large red petals and long pistils

This cactus covered with many tiny yellow blooms is a great attraction for a busy bee looking to collect nectar and pollen.

Bee on yellow cactus blooms
Bee on yellow cactus blooms

Very close to the complementary red and green I shared above, here is a splash of pink and green with this beautiful pink powder puff flower.

Pink powder puff tree - Calliandra Haematocephala
Pink powder puff tree – Calliandra Haematocephala

Yellow and green aren’t complementary colors but I still like the way they look together with this yellow rose flower about to open.

Yellow rose about to open
Yellow rose about to open

Nature sure knows how to make good use of complementary colors everywhere, such as purple and yellow on this large lily flower.

Pistils of a purple and yellow lily
Pistils of a purple and yellow lily

Orange and blue are another set of complementary colors. Is there any better background than a bright blue sky for these orange maple leaves?

Maple tree leaves
Maple tree leaves

Finally, the good thing about white is that it goes well with almost any other color. I love the soft glow it emits when put against a green background. Enjoy this white rose covered with dew drops and a white powder puff bloom as my last two choices for this colorful theme.

Morning dew on a white rose
Morning dew on a white rose
White powder puff bloom
White powder puff bloom

Travel theme: Contrast

Zazzle online shop If you enjoy my photos and would like to purchase some, I want to thank you! Simply visit my Zazzle online shop and browse the product offerings. If there’s a photo you would like to purchase but don’t see it in my shop, please contact me by using the Contact form at the bottom of my home page and let me know which photos you are interested in purchasing, and in what format / medium.

Today I’m participating in Where’s My Backpack’s Travel Theme photo challenge. This week’s theme is contrast. Enjoy my photos and remember you can click on each photo for a larger view.

Sorry if you’ve seen this photo earlier this week, but I think it illustrates how you can compose a great photo by contrasting different colors.

Travel theme: Contrast - Orange protea pincushion and purple lavender
Travel theme: Contrast – Orange protea pincushion and purple lavender

Red and green contrast well to make this red hibiscus flower stand out.

Travel theme: Contrast - Red hibiscus flower
Travel theme: Contrast – Red hibiscus flower

The darkness of the water offers a nice contrast with the lit sea jellies.

Travel theme: Contrast - Sea jellies
Travel theme: Contrast – Sea jellies

Of course, there no bigger contrast than white on black. Here’s an almost white full moon on a dark blue sky. You can view a large full moon in a pitch black sky here.

Travel theme: Contrast - Moon rising beyond the trees
Travel theme: Contrast – Moon rising beyond the trees